3

   
 

Unexplained anaemia (<8.0 g/dl ), neutropenia (<0.5 x 109/L3) and or chronic thrombocytopenia (<50 x 109/ L3)
The diagnosis is confirmed by laboratory testing, which can no tbe explained by other non-HIV conditions.

Of these hemotologic manifestations of HIV infection, chronic thrombocytopenia is the most common symptomatic manifestation.

Petichial hemorrhage is seen in this 1-year-old boy.

 

 

Epistaxis was the presenting symptom of HIV infection in this 5 year-old child. Her platelet count was 30,000 cells/cu.mm. The thrombocytopenia subsided with antiretroviral agents. Corticosteroid was not given.

 

Bleeding per gum and purpura were the first manifestations of HIV infection in this 7-year-old child. Her platelet count was below 20,000 cells/mm3. She responded slowly to corticosteroid therapy. Unexplained anaemia (<8.0 g/dl ), neutropenia (<0.5 x 109/L3) and or chronic thrombocytopenia (<50 x 109/ L3) are the hematologic manifestations of HIV infection. Involvement of the hematopoietic system tends to be more severe in advanced stages of the disease. Peripheral destruction of blood elements seems to be the reason for these abnormalities. Immune-mediated mechanisms are believed to be the most common cause of the HIV-associated thrombocytopenia. Antiplatelet antibodies are commonly identified in thrombocytopenic HIV-infected individuals, and HIV-associated thrombocytopenia is typically responsive to intravenous immunoglobulin, coticosteroids, or splenectomy.

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